Graduate Students

Acevedo

About:

Stefanie Acevedo (2012) is a PhD student in music theory. She holds a B.M. in music composition from the University of Florida, an M.M. in music theory from Bowling Green State University, and an M.A. in psychology, with an emphasis on music cognition, from the University at Buffalo. While at BGSU, she completed a thesis on atonal segmentation. At Buffalo, she worked in the Auditory Perception and Action lab (http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu). Her thesis focused on metrical and motivic interaction in the perception of tonal patterns.  

Her current research interests include musical segmentation and categorization, form, schema theory, and pedagogical applications of cognitive models.

Photo by Karjaka Studios (http://karjaka.com/)

 


Andries

Annelies Andries

Email:

annelies.andries@yale.edu

About:

Annelies Andries (2011) is a PhD student in music history. After receiving a B.A. in vocal performance at the Conservatory of her native city Antwerp, she studied musicology at the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium) and in Berlin. Annelies graduated with a master’s thesis on the use of song/aria in Monteverdi’s Venetian operas. Her current interests include reception history, performance theory, and form and dramaturgy in opera. Her internship in the dramaturgical department of the Flemish Opera for Rossini’s Semiramide and Monteverdi’s Il ritorno d’Ulisse, also drew her attention to issues concerning historical and current staging practices.


Betson

Nick Betson

Email:

nick.betson@yale.edu

About:

Nick Betson came to Yale in 2005 after studying in Chicago and Berlin.  His research interests include the history of music theory and criticism (especially of the 19th and 20th centuries), hermeneutics, Adorno, Marxes of any kind, the lyric in music, and Mozart's operas.


Chu

Jennifer Chu

Email:

jennifer.chu@yale.edu

About:

Jennifer Chu (2009) is a Ph.D. candidate in music history. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in history and a Bachelor of Music in piano performance from the University of New Mexico, and she also earned a Master of Music degree in musicology from the University of Texas at Austin where she wrote a thesis on music in an 18th-century New Orleans convent. Her dissertation explores the sonic and visual representation of performers who take on alter egos in musical performance and composition. Her current research interests include popular music and experimental composition since 1945, critical studies in voice, identity and embodiment, race and gender, poststructuralism, musical hybridity, transnational and diasporic music scenes, and music technologies.


Chung

Andrew Chung

Email:

andrew.j.chung@yale.edu

About:

Andrew Chung (2013) received his B.A. in music and neuroscience from Wesleyan University, where he studied with Yonatan Malin, Neely Bruce, Alvin Lucier and Jane Alden. His thesis work concerned interrelations between Lewinian transformational analysis and musical interpretation. One area of active research involves relating bodily gesture and musical performance to transformational models, another explores reconciling late counter-reformation polyphony with transformational analysis. Other interests include the post-war avant garde, death metal and critical theory. Andrew's earliest musical formation was as a pianist. He maintains enthusiastic interests in performing music of the past century and remains (somewhat) active as a collaborative pianist/accompanist. 


Chung

Holly Chung

Email:

holly.chung@yale.edu

About:

Holly Chung is a Ph.D. student in Music History. Her research interests center on French music of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly the music of Ravel and Debussy. In addition, she is interested in exploring questions of musical shape and form, projections of the "exotic" and "oriental," and the work of women composers and teachers in this period.
She studied piano in the Preparatory Division at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music under Tomoko Hagiwara and continues her performance studies at Yale. She holds the degree of Bachelor of Arts, magna cum laude, in Music and French and Francophone Studies from Columbia University. Her senior thesis, written under the direction of Prof. Walter Frisch, explored cyclic procedures in Ravel's String Quartet. She has also completed graduate work at McGill University, where she served as a teaching assistant for the undergraduate music history survey, a research assistant to Profs. Steven Huebner and Heidi Epstein, and the resident program annotator.


Davis

Angharad Davis

Email:

angharad.davis@yale.edu

About:

Angharad Davis (2009) is a PhD candidate in music history, currently working on a dissertation which examines musical representations of the city in the 1920s. She completed her M.Mus. in musicology at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, studying listener interactions with musical quotation in Berio and P.D.Q. Bach. Her honours thesis on the symbolism of birdsong in contemporary composition, for which she won the university medal, was completed at the same institution. Angharad is interested in the relationship between music and the environment, reception and horizon theories, cultural and social histories of music, and the interplay between music and dance. She has recently developed an enthusiasm for Sacred Harp singing and shape-note musical traditions as they are manifest in the U.S. and around the world.


Dunagin

Amy Dunagin

Email:

amy.dunagin@yale.edu

About:

Amy Dunagin (2007) holds a bachelors degree in history from Yale University, where she wrote a senior thesis on political broadside ballads and their influence in Restoration England. She is pursuing a joint Ph.D. program in history, music history and Renaissance studies.  Her dissertation, entitled “Secularization, National Identity, and the Baroque: Italian Music in England, 1660-1714," asks why English men and women in the later seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries emulated and imported Italian music and musicians despite deep-seated anti-Catholicism and xenophobia.  Her research was supported by the Council on Library and Information Resources Mellon Dissertation Fellowship in the Humanities in Original Sources.


Duncan

Stuart Duncan

Email:

stuart.duncan@yale.edu

About:

From Ramsgate in England, Stuart is currently pursuing a doctorate in music theory. He finished a prior doctorate in composition and organ performance at Cornell University, studying with Pulitzer-prize winning composer Steven Stucky. As a Yale Teaching Center Fellow, Stuart leads and develops workshops in various areas of education pedagogy. In addition to co-developing a manuscript on music pedagogy and prison education, his research interests include the music of Benjamin Britten, metric and rhythmic analysis, and performance practice and aesthetics in 1980s New Complexity. Stuart is also a music director and organist at St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Milford, CT.


Frankel

Lauren Frankel

Email:

lauren.frankel@yale.edu

About:

Lauren Holmes Frankel (2006) is a PhD candidate in musicology. A native of Arizona, she received a Bachelor of Music in Music History from Rice University, where she wrote a senior thesis on music in the works of Virginia Woolf. Her dissertation, which investigates the relationships between Finnish politics, identity, and nationalism and the institutional support of contemporary music in Finland, has been supported by grants from the Fulbright foundation, the American-Scandinavian Foundation, and the Lois Roth Endowment. A pianist by training, Lauren is a founding member of Yale's Gamelan Suprabanggo, and can also be heard playing chromatic button accordion in her Nordic folk music band, Linnunrata.


Gailey

Joshua Gailey

Email:

joshua.gailey@yale.edu

About:

Joshua Gailey (2013) is a PhD student in Music History. Originally from Port Angeles, WA, Joshua graduated summa cum laude from the University of Washington with degrees in Music History, Trumpet Performance, and Italian Studies. His undergraduate thesis, written with the faculty support of Dr. Stephen Rumph, explored the compositional approaches of Verdi and Wagner in working with nineteenth-century operatic conventions. His current research interests include nineteenth-century opera, nineteenth- and twentieth-century symphonic music, music and politics, and hermeneutics. Joshua is also an active trumpet player, and has studied with David Gordon, Allen Vizzutti, and Justin Emerich.


Glynias

Marissa Glynias

Email:

marissa.glynias@yale.edu

About:

Marissa Glynias (2012) is a PhD student in ethnomusicology.  Originally from Cleveland, OH, she graduated from Harvard College in 2012 with an A.B. in Music and Archaeology, where she wrote her senior thesis on the archaeomusicology of bone flutes from the Upper Paleolithic in Germany and Nasca-period Peru. Currently, she is investigating the role of Catholic music inside and outside of the Church in Vezo villages on the Southwestern coast of Madagascar, and the manner in which Catholic songs have been popularized and utilized in non-Catholic ritual contexts. Her primary interests include connections between music and ritual, embodiment and dance, and the material culture of music.   Outside of the classroom, she enjoys playing flute in Joga, a Samba band with fellow graduate student Stephen Guerra, and singing in Schola Cantorum through the Yale Institute of Sacred Music. 


Goldberg

Daniel Goldberg

Email:

daniel.goldberg@yale.edu

About:

Daniel Goldberg (2010) is a PhD student in music theory. Originally from Pennsylvania, Daniel holds a BA in music from Carleton College and an MA in music theory from the University of British Columbia. His dissertation concerns timing in the performance of meter in Balkan folk music, and his research interests include music cognition, social meanings of music, and rhythm and meter in art musics since the nineteenth century.  Daniel is also a committed euphoniumist.


Guerra

Stephen Guerra

Email:

stephen.guerra@yale.edu

About:

Stephen Paul Guerra (2012) is a Ph.D. student of music theory. He holds a B.S. in systems engineering (focusing on finance and management) from the University of Pennsylvania and a B.M. in music theory (with concentration in classical guitar performance and composition) from the Boyer College of Music at Temple University. Between these, Stephen worked professionally for several years as a financial analyst. Stephen’s music-theoretical interests center around rhythm and meter, and harmony and counterpoint. He is drawn to the music from the ‘extended common practice’ and to art, popular, and folk music of Brazil. Stephen also studies Brazilian percussion and plays guitar in a quartet, drawing his inspiration primarily from the music of Brazilian guitarists Baden Powell and Raphael Rabello.


Guez

Jonathan Guez

Email:

jonathan.guez@yale.edu

About:

Jonathan Guez is originally from Houston, TX.  Before matriculating at Yale in 2008 he earned a certificate of piano performance at the Schola Cantorum in Paris (2004), a Bachelor of Arts degree in piano performance from Texas Tech University (2005), and a Master of Music degree in music theory from Indiana University Bloomington (2008).  His current research interests include the studies of nineteenth-century sonata forms from Schenkerian and Sonata-Theory perspectives, treatments of thematic material in the instrumental music of Schubert, the Wagner operas, gesture and musical meaning, and philosophical trends generally.  He has participated in graduate-student workshops devoted to Sonata Theory, operatic form, and new ontologies of music.  He has presented papers at regional and international conferences.  In the Spring of 2013 he was invited to present a paper entitled "Parsifal as Domestication Script" by the University of Helsinki.  His paper "Prolongation and Persistence in Act II Scene 1 of Tristan und Isolde" was published in the Journal of Schenkerian Studies (2013).  His dissertation engages issues of thematic presentation, form, and meaning in the instrumental music of Schubert.


Hill

Moira Hill

Email:

moira.hill@yale.edu

About:

Moira Leanne Hill (2007), a Ph. D. candidate in music history, holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music from Harvard College, where she wrote her senior thesis on the influence of innovations in Italian vocal music on the sacred vocal concerti of Matthias Weckmann (1616-1674) under the supervision of Christoph Wolff. She also holds a Master of Arts degree in Musicology from the University of Minnesota, where she completed a thesis examining the significance of two early seventeenth-century central German organ tablatures in demonstrating the existence of a parallel accompanimental practice to continuo. Her doctoral dissertation, entitled "Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's Passion Settings: Context, Content, and Impact", is being supervised by Markus Rathey and Patrick McCreless. Her research interests include seventeenth- and eighteenth-century German repertoires, particularly sacred music and keyboard idioms of this period, the intersection of performance practice with musicological research, historical keyboard instruments and their construction, historical tuning systems, manuscript and early print study, and issues of editing music, as well as evolutionary and cultural theories on the origins of music.


Horn

Mary Horn

Email:

mary.horn@yale.edu

About:

Mary Horn (2011) is a Ph.D. student in Music History. She earned a B.A. in Music at Skidmore College, where she studied music history, vocal performance, and studio art. Studies abroad at Oxford University and archival research projects in New York and Washington D.C. piqued her interest in music history, specifically. Her most recent research project, a senior honors thesis completed in Spring 2011, centers on the evolution of Leonard Bernstein's Norton Lectures (1973) and his lasting legacy as a public educator. Her current research interests include 20th century American music and the relationship between music and art, among other things.


Hynes

Liam Hynes

Email:

liam.hynes@yale.edu

About:

Liam Hynes (2013) is a PhD student in music theory. Originally from Amherst, Massachusetts, he holds a BA in Music and East Asian Studies from Brown University and is interested in the harmonic languages and tonal structures of (roughly) 16th- through 19th-century European music. He has a particularly strong affection for sonata-form architecture, though his field of interest extends at least as far back as the Renaissance and continues to expand. He is also a cellist and composer, and enjoys singing when given the chance. Other interests include enka and etymology.


Johnson-Hill

Erin Johnson-Hill

Email:

erin.johnson-hill@yale.edu

About:

Erin Johnson-Hill is a third year student in the music history program. Holding an undergraduate degree from Otago University in New Zealand and an MPhil from Cambridge University in the UK, her increasingly interdisciplinary research interests include nineteenth-century British music and visual culture, social and economic histories of musical education, and the relationship of musical institutions in Britain to colonial and imperial culture. In preparation for writing her dissertation prospectus this year she is continuing to work in various areas of visual culture and its relevance to music's role in British-colonial societies. In her spare time Erin enjoys playing the cello and a wide variety of choral singing.


Jones

Andrew Jones

Email:

andrew.d.jones@yale.edu

About:

Andrew Jones (2010) is a Ph.D. student in music theory and holds an A.B. in Physics from Princeton University. Early interests in cello performance and physics collided during his undergraduate years, producing a love for the formalism of music theory and a socially detrimental addiction to vintage and high-fidelity audio and electronics. His long-term research goals center on the construction of quantitative systems and tools for harmonic, melodic, and rhythmic analysis from a mathematically-inclined perspective.


Judd

Aaron Judd

Email:

aaron.judd@yale.edu

About:

Aaron Judd (2008) hails from Portland, Oregon and graduated from Oberlin College/Conservatory with degrees in Composition and English literature. His dissertation project addresses space and place as arenas of social imagination in the work of contemporary Chinese composers. He is also interested in the broader history of Western classical music in East Asia (in particular, China), musical titles and programs, and the history and aesthetics of orchestration. During the 2011-12 year he will be based in Hong Kong - specifically in the maze of shopping malls around the Sha Tin MTR station - pursuing his research on a Fulbright grant.


Kieffer

Allie Kieffer

Email:

alexandra.kieffer@yale.edu

About:

Alexandra Kieffer (2008) is a Ph.D. candidate in music history. She holds a B.A. in music from Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa, where she wrote a senior thesis on the chamber music of Gabriel Fauré. Her dissertation, "Mediating Sound: Debussyism and the Imagining of Modern Aurality," explores the music of Debussy and Ravel c. 1895 to 1910 in the context of emerging conceptions of sound and listening at the turn of the twentieth century. Her other interests include vision and hearing in the nineteenth century, cultural histories of science, musical representation, constructions of the voice in twentieth-century philosophy, and music and gender. Her dissertation research has been supported by the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation and the American Musicological Society's M. Elizabeth C. Bartlet fund


Koai

Kevin Koai

Email:

kevin.koai@yale.edu

About:

Kevin Koai (2009) is a Ph.D. student in music history who holds a B.A. in music (concentration in piano performance) and English from Stanford University. His research interests include late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century art song, theories of lyric and narrative in music, early sound recording, historical approaches to the body, and modern pop music. Kevin performs as a collaborative pianist, chamber musician, and choral singer, and he currently sings with Yale Schola Cantorum.


Ladd

Marco Ladd

Email:

marc.ladd@yale.edu

About:

Marco Ladd (2013) is a PhD student in music history. Originally from Edinburgh in the UK, he obtained a BA and MPhil from the University of Cambridge, where he developed a keen interest in the Italian operatic repertory. His MPhil thesis, written under the supervision of Dr. Benjamin Walton, concerned the genesis, early reception and broader contextualisation of Pietro Mascagni's score for the 1914 silent film, Rapsodia satanica. Marco's research interests centre around intersections between operatic and technological history, and include early recording technologies, operatic realism, film music (particularly of the silent era) and sound studies. In his spare time, he enjoys singing Anglican choral music, and spending too much time cooking.


Long

About:

Megan Kaes Long (2008), is a Ph.D. candidate in Music Theory. Megan is a native of Littleton, Colorado, and holds a B.A. in Music with an emphasis in piano performance from Pomona College in Claremont, California. Her dissertation explores the relationship between affect and genre in the English madrigal, and situates this repertoire at the forefront of the development of English tonality. Megan's research interests include 16th-century music in England and on the Continent, 20th-century tonal music, music and text, and the history of theory (especially the history of modality and tonality). Megan is an avid singer, pianist, and handbell ringer, and she is a member of Yale's Schola Cantorum.


Medina-Gray

Elizabeth Medina-Gray

Email:

elizabeth.medina-gray@yale.edu

About:

Elizabeth Medina-Gray (2008) holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in music and chemistry from Swarthmore College, and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in music theory. Her dissertation, "Modular Structure and Function in Early 21st-century Video Game Music," explores modular music in recent video games, and develops novel methods for analyzing this music. Her wider interests include music in modern multimedia, 20th century tonal music, and mathematical musical models.


Motazedian

Tahirih Motazedian

Email:

About:

Tahirih Motazedian (2011) is a PhD candidate in music theory. She has a B.S. in geophysics from University of Oregon and a B.A. in music theory from University of Arizona. She spent several years working as a planetary scientist for NASA before deciding to return to the music world. As a scientist she published a theory about water on Mars which garnered widespread international attention. To start off her career as a music theorist she has given conference presentations about her research on Stravinsky's Serenade sketches, and what they reveal about his compositional process. Her musical interests are centered around film music, 19th-century music, and the music of Rachmaninoff.


Muniz

John Muniz

Email:

john.muniz@yale.edu

About:

John Muniz (2009) is a PhD candidate in music theory. He holds a BA with Highest Honors in music from The College of William & Mary and an MM in music composition from Boston University. His research interests include tonal chromaticism, form, musical narrative and phenomenology, aesthetics, and the music of Scriabin. He is currently writing a dissertation on enharmonic techniques in nineteenth-century music.


Park

James Park

Email:

james.park@yale.edu

About:

James Park (2008) received his A.B. in Music from Princeton University, where he wrote his senior thesis on Samuel Barber's Symphony in One Movement. His dissertation investigates the notion of musical modernism(s) in the early 20th century and explores the roles of traditions and institutions as agents of modernism, with a particular focus on Samuel Barber and his works of the 1930s. He is also a violinist in the Yale Symphony Orchestra and an avid chamber musician.


Perry

Rebecca Perry

Email:

rebecca.perry@yale.edu

About:

Rebecca Perry (2010) is a Ph.D. student in music history. A native of Rolla, Missouri, Becky hails most recently from Brigham Young University, where she completed undergraduate work in piano performance and political science. Currently, Becky's research focuses on idiosyncrasies of form and thematic process in Prokofiev's early instrumental music.


Raz

Carmel Raz

Email:

carmel.raz@yale.edu

Website:

www.carmelraz.com

 

About:

Carmel Raz is writing a dissertation on the relationship between Enlightenment models of the nervous system and early Romantic music, advised by Pat McCreless. Additional interests include contemporary music, music and technology, and the Israeli Piyut revival. She holds a Diplom in violin performance from the Hochschule für Musik "Hanns Eisler" in Berlin, Germany, and a Masters degree in composition from the University of Chicago.


Rodgers

Mark Rodgers

Email:

mark.rodgers@yale.edu

About:

Mark Rodgers (2012) earned a BA in Music and Comparative Literature from the University of California, Berkeley, and an MSt in Musicology from the University of Oxford. His research interests include historiography, comparative approaches to early-modern song, material culture and patronage, auditory culture, and popular song. Additionally, he maintains interdisciplinary interests in ancient and early-modern literature, history of science, and the history of art. 


Rogotzke

Valerie Rogotzke

Email:

valerie.rogotzke@yale.edu

About:

Valerie Rogotzke (2007) studies Music History at Yale. She holds a Bachelor of Music degree in vocal performance from the Peabody Conservatory and a Master of Music degree from Rice University, where she studied voice and musicology, and has completed additional coursework at the Universiteti Oslo. Her research interests range from Medieval and Renaissance music to vocal music of all kinds to Scandinavian folk music and nationalism. She has performed in a wide variety of operas, recitals, and early music ensembles, most recently as a hen in Janácek's The Cunning Little Vixen with Houston Grand Opera, and currently sings with Yale's Schola Cantorum.


Salem

Joseph Salem

Email:

joseph.salem@yale.edu

About:

Joseph Salem (2007) is originally from Cincinnati, OH, where he studied piano at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music. He holds a BM in Piano from the University of Texas at Austin and an MA in Music Theory from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. As a lover of new and old traditions, Joe pursues topics at the boundaries of the musicological discourse: musical/intellectual history, analytical studies of post-Wagnerian music and writings, semiotics, music aesthetics, and hermeneutic trends in the arts. His dissertation examines the development of Boulez's serial techniques between 1948 and 1962 through a close examination of the composer's manuscripts housed at the Paul Sacher Stiftung. Previous studies have focused on the manuscripts of Francesco Cavalli and WA Mozart, among others. He's also a cat lover and silly for culinary delights. 


Schartmann

Andrew Schartmann

Email:

andrew.schartmann@yale.edu

Website:

www.andrewschartmann.com

About:

Andrew Schartmann (2011) is a PhD student in music theory. He holds a BMus and MA in music theory from McGill University, where he also taught for several years. In 2011, he was awarded the Schulich School of Music Teaching Award for his course on musical form in the music of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. 

Most recently, his pedagogical interests have led him to explore the ways in which digital technology can improve the teaching of music. His companion site for the forthcoming textbook Analyzing Classical Form (Oxford University Press, September 2013) provides an innovative tool to enhance the learning experience.

Andrew's primary research interests in the classical domain include musical form, pedagogy, and orchestration. In the world of non-classical music, he has a soft spot for early videogame music. His forthcoming book entitled Maestro Mario: How Nintendo Transformed Videogame Music into an Art (Thought Catalog, July 2013) explores how composers at Nintendo in the mid-1980s transformed music from a purely functional component of videogames into a veritable art form.

In his spare time, Andrew serves as an assistant editor at DSCH Journal. He is also a reviewer and weekly columnist for Music & Vision magazine. Find out more about his current projects at www.andrewschartmann.com.


Schelling

Kamala Schelling

Email:

kamala.schelling@yale.edu

About:

 

After beginning her tertiary education at the age of 13 at the University of Utah, Kamala Schelling went on to receive undergraduate degrees in music and math from Rice University, where she graduated Magna cum lauda.While specializing in piano performance at Rice, Kamala developed a keen interest in Renaissance Italian music; since then, her interests have branched out both geographically and temporally, and now range from the seventeenth-century Ottoman Empire to the role of music in contemporary theater productions.  As the recipient of a MacMillan Center Pre-Dissertation grant, Kamala spent the Fall 2012 semester in Istanbul researching the musical and cultural intersections between the Ottoman Empire and the Venetian Republic.  In her spare time, Kamala likes to bake bread, drink cappuccinos, and read novels in Italian, French, Spanish, German, and Turkish.


Schullman

Matthew Schullman

Email:

matthew.schullman@yale.edu

About:

Matthew Schullman (2008) is a graduate student in Music Theory, and comes to Yale from Boston, MA, where he earned a B.A. and an M.A. in Music from Boston University. To date, Matthew’s research interests have revolved primarily around the formal analysis of 20th c. music, and this is reflected in his dissertation, which aims at investigating form in a handful of Luciano Berio’s Sequenzas. In his free time, Matthew serves as co-chair/co-founder of the SMT interest group on post-WWII music analysis; he also works with the artistic staff of the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra, practices the piano, and spends time outdoors.

 

 


Selinsky

Peter Selinsky

Email:

peter.selinsky@yale.edu

About:

Peter Selinsky (2012) is a music theory student. He has an MA in music theory from SUNY at Buffalo and a BA in music and mathematics from Skidmore College. His research interests include modern jazz, the math and music intersection, rhythmic and metric theory, transformational theory, and scale theory. His previous research explored metric formations in the music of the Mahavishnu Orchestra. Peter also plays the electric bass in a wide variety of styles and loves to run up (and down) mountains.


Stockford

Janine Stockford

Email:

janine.stockford@yale.edu

About:

Janine Stockford (2013) is a PhD student in ethnomusicology. She holds a bachelor's degree in cinema studies from the University of Toronto and a master's degree in music from the University of Alberta. Her research interests center around North American popular music, the music industry, and the politics of musical taste. Her master's thesis examined the globalization of Canadian pop divas Céline Dion and Shania Twain with fieldwork based in Las Vegas.


Thomas

Christy Thomas

Email:

christy.thomas@yale.edu

About:

Christy Thomas is a Ph.D. candidate in Music History. Originally from Baltimore, MD, she holds a Bachelor of Arts in Music, Art History, and History from McDaniel College. In her dissertation, she considers the historical relationship between Puccini's operas and contemporaneous cinema within the contexts of late 19th- and early 20th-century visual culture and performance traditions. Her broad research interests include the history and theory of opera, reception studies, cultural history, and the theoretical and conceptual issues of performance and mediation. In addition to lecturing on Puccini’s operas in both English and Italian, she has given talks on Debussy, Wagner, verismo, opera staging, and the intersection of opera and multimedia, and has also written a forthcoming encyclopedia article on women in jazz. As a classically trained singer, she has been involved with several professional opera productions, and still enjoys performing when the opportunity arises.

 


White

Christopher White

Email:

christopher.w.white@yale.edu

About:

Christopher White (2007) is a Ph.D. candidate in Music Theory. Chris holds a B.A. and B.Mus. from Oberlin College/Conservatory of Music where he studied organ with James David Christie and Haskell Thompson. He also received an M.A. in Music Theory from Queens College, CUNY. His interests include late Romanticism (especially the musical shift from the late 19th to the early 20th century), Schenker, pop music analysis, and Marxism. He also is interested in computationally-based language theories, and his dissertation investigates several computational models of musical style, function, and communication. 

 You can read more about his work at christopherwmwhite.commons.yale.edu



Yoo Leaman

Kara Yoo Leaman

Email:

kara.leaman@yale.edu

About:

Kara Yoo Leaman is a Ph.D. candidate in Music Theory.  She holds an M.A. in Music Theory from Queens College/CUNY and an A.B. in Economics from Harvard.  Her dissertation explores the rhythmic and metric interplay of music and dance in George Balanchine's choreography to Tchaikovsky's music and develops an analytic notation that visualizes dance in relation to music.  Other research interests include theory pedagogy, Schenker, American music history, dance history, and Laban movement analysis.  


Zikanov

Kirill Zikanov

Email:

kirill.zikanov@yale.edu

About:

Kirill Zikanov (2011) is a Ph.D. student in music history and holds a B.S. in economics from Duke University. His research interests include contemporary music, computational approaches to the study of music, macroanalytical investigations of musical culture, and music of the Russian Empire.


Yale University's Programs of Study in Music

For more information, email: 

leah.jehan@yale.edu, Senior Administrative Assistant

About:

The Department of Music at Yale University offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in Music with undergraduate courses in composition and music technology, ethnomusicology, music history, music theater, music theory and performance.  For more information, see the undergraduate music program.

The Ph.D degree in Music is offered in ethnomusicology, music history, and music theory.  For more information, see the graduate music program.

It is the 
Yale School of Music that offers graduate degrees in composition, conducting and performance.  Sacred music study is undertaken at the Yale Institute of Sacred Music.